Jenifer
MacGillvary

Publications Coordinator

Phone: (510) 642-9157

jmacgill@berkeley.edu

Program Area

Communications

About Jenifer

Jenifer MacGillvary is a writer and editor at the Labor Center, and coordinates the production of Labor Center books and reports. She is co-author of several reports on the public cost of low wages and has also written on the union difference. With other members of the communications team, she manages the Labor Center’s website and social media. She joined the Labor Center staff in 2003; prior to that she worked at nonprofit advocacy, training, and educational organizations in New York City and North Carolina. A native of Connecticut, she received her master’s degree in political science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

    Ken Jacobs, Kuochih Huang, Jenifer MacGillvaryand Enrique Lopezlira

    The Public Cost of Low-Wage Jobs in the Illinois Construction Industry

    In this research brief we provide estimates of safety net use among families of construction workers in Illinois. We find that 34% of families of construction workers in Illinois are enrolled in one or more safety net programs at a cost to the state and the federal government of over half a billion dollars per year. By comparison, among all Illinois workers, 30% have a family member enrolled in one or more safety net programs. The rate at which construction workers lack health insurance (21%) is more than two and a half times the rate for all workers in Illinois (8%).

    Ken Jacobs, Kuochih Huang, Jenifer MacGillvaryand Enrique Lopezlira

    The Public Cost of Low-Wage Jobs in the US Construction Industry

    In this paper we look at the use by construction workers and their families in the United States of five means-tested safety net programs. We find that 39% of families of construction workers are enrolled in one or more safety net program at a cost of almost $28 billion per year. In comparison, 31% of all workers have a family member enrolled in a safety net program. Three times as many construction workers as all workers lack health insurance (31% compared to 10%).

    Ken Jacobs, Kuochih Huang, Jenifer MacGillvaryand Enrique Lopezlira

    The Public Cost of Low-Wage Jobs in the Connecticut Construction Industry

    In this research brief we provide estimates of safety net use among families of construction workers in Connecticut. We find that 39% of families of construction workers in Connecticut are enrolled in one or more safety net programs at a cost to the state and the federal government of over a quarter of a billion dollars per year. By comparison, among all Connecticut workers, 29% have a family member enrolled in one or more safety net programs. Nearly one-quarter (24%) of construction workers lack health insurance, more than three times the rate for all workers in Connecticut (7%).

    Ken Jacobs, Kuochih Huang, Jenifer MacGillvaryand Enrique Lopezlira

    The Public Cost of Low-Wage Jobs in the Pennsylvania Construction Industry

    In this research brief we provide estimates of safety net use among families of construction workers in Pennsylvania. We find that 28% of families of construction workers in Pennsylvania are enrolled in one or more safety net programs at a cost to the state and the federal government of $428 million per year. Compared to all Pennsylvania workers, construction workers are more than twice as likely to lack health insurance (7% compared to 16%).

    Ken Jacobs, Kuochih Huang, Jenifer MacGillvaryand Enrique Lopezlira

    The Public Cost of Low-Wage Jobs in the Washington Construction Industry

    In this research brief we provide estimates of safety net use among families of construction workers in Washington. We find that 38% of families of construction workers in Washington are enrolled in one or more safety net programs at a cost to the state and the federal government of over half a billion dollars per year. By comparison, among all Washington workers, 32% have a family member enrolled in one or more safety net programs. The rate at which construction workers lack health insurance is close to three times the rate for all workers in Washington (22% compared to 8%).